Why you should ride bikes

  • 47% of Americans would like to see more bike lanes, trails, and bridges in their communities.
  • 50% of trips Americans make are less than one mile. (US Department of Transportation, 2009)
  • $8,000 spent on average each year for owning and operating a car.
  • 3 hours of riding per week reduces the risk of heart disease and stroke by 50%.
  • $10 saved each day by commuting 10 miles round trip by bicycle instead of car.
  • Women who bike 30 plus minutes a day have a lower risk of developing breast cancer.
  •  (Luoto, R., et al., 2000)
  • Adolescents who bike are 48% less likely to be overweight as adults. (Menschik, D, et al., 2008).
  • The average commuter cyclist has just 1 accident every 8.7 years.
  • For every 1 mile pedaled rather than driven, nearly 1 pound of CO¬≤ (0.88 lbs) is saved.
  • (US Environmental Protection Agency, 2009)
  • 47% of Americans say they would like more bike facilities in their communities.
  • (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2008)
  • A short 5-mile roundtrip daily car commute emits nearly 1,000 pounds of carbon dioxide per year.
  • Save $10 a week in gasoline or $520 a year.
  • Commuting by bicycle 15 miles per week reduces co2 emissions, 15 lbs reduces your carbon
  • footprint by 900 pounds per year.
  • If 1,000 people commute by bicycle co2 emissions can be reduced by almost 1 million pounds per year.
  • In the United States alone, there are more than 100 million passenger cars on the roads being
  • driven by a single individual for personal transportation, which is extremely inefficient.
  •  A four-mile trip by car adds 15 pounds of pollutants to the air we all breathe; by making that a bike
  • ride instead, you help keep the air clean.
  •  Millions of animals are killed by cars each year as a result of direct collisions, bicycles do not do this.